Synthesis of lead(II,IV) oxide

Preparation of lead(II,IV) oxide

Preparation of lead(II,IV) oxide from lead oxide

Preparation of lead(II,IV) oxide from lead oxide

Preparation of lead(II,IV) oxide from lead oxide

25 grams of lead monoxide is spread in a thin layer on an iron or aluminum plate 2-4 mm thick. Instead of lead oxide, lead carbonate could be used, which on heating yields a very pure and finely divided lead monoxide. The lead oxide is heated over a ring burner so adjusted that the flames do not quite touch the metal plate. The plate must be kept just below a perceptible red heat (350-400° C). The heating is continued for 6 hours or more. Great care must be taken to keep the material stirred during the heating so that the under layers do not become superheated and changed to lead monoxide. When the reaction is complete, the lead(II,IV) oxide is dark brown when hot, a bright scarlet-red when partly cooled, and a somewhat less brilliant red when entirely cold. It is rather difficult to adjust the temperature successfully for the preparation of lead(II,IV) oxide by described method.

Preparation of lead(II,IV) oxide from lead oxide and lead dioxide

Preparation of lead(II,IV) oxide from lead oxide and lead dioxide

Preparation of lead(II,IV) oxide from lead oxide and lead dioxide

33 grams of lead oxide (litharge), 24 grams of lead dioxide and 50 ml of 6N NaOH are placed in a 600 ml beaker. The mixture is stirred thoroughly and left at 80° C, and when the mass becomes dry water is added until the contents have become bright red. Finally, the obtained lead(II,IV) is washed thoroughly by decantation and rinsed on the filter. Lead(II,IV) is left to drain over night, removed from the filter and dried. The dry oxide is transferred in a casserole and heated in a flame about 5 cm high by holding the casserole in the hand and rotating it in the flame. At the correct temperature (350-400° C) the material becomes a dark reddish brown; after cooling it is a much more brilliant red than before heating. Great care must be taken to keep the material stirred during the heating so that the under layers do not become superheated and changed to lead monoxide.

Synthetic inorganic chemistry, by A. A. Blanchard, 281-283, 1936

IUPAC Name

1,3,5,7-tetraoxa-2$l^{2},4,6$l^{2}-triplumbaspiro[3.3]heptane

InChI

InChI=1S/4O.3Pb

InChI Key

XMFOQHDPRMAJNU-UHFFFAOYSA-N

Canonical SMILES

O1[Pb]O[Pb]12O[Pb]O2

Depositor-Supplied Synonyms

Lead oxide, red, 11536_RIEDEL, 241547_ALDRICH, 577847_ALDRICH, 11536_SIAL, AKOS015903584, I14-18085

Removed Synonyms

Minium, Lead oxide, Red Lead Oxide, Lead(ii,iv) oxide, Trilead tetraoxide, 1314-41-6

IUPAC Name

1,3,5,2,4$l^{2},6$l^{2}-trioxatriplumbinane 2-oxide

InChI

InChI=1S/4O.3Pb

InChI Key

XMFOQHDPRMAJNU-UHFFFAOYSA-N

Canonical SMILES

O=[Pb]1O[Pb]O[Pb]O1

Depositor-Supplied Synonyms

Tri-lead tetroxide

Removed Synonyms

Red Lead Oxide, Lead(ii,iv) oxide, 1314-41-6

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1 comment

  1. Jeff Edmonds

    I have read of a synthesis using Elemental LED or lead metal glacial acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide 3%. I am not a chemist but I believe the hydrogen peroxide is used to oxidize the lead? Could this be substituted with bubbling ozone?

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