Synthesis of hydrobromic acid

Preparation of hydrobromic acid

Of the six methods given here, the first three may be used for the production of gaseous hydrogen bromide as well as for aqueous solutions of the gas; rest of them could be employed only for making the constant-boiling hydrobromic acid acid.

1) Preparation of hydrobromic acid directly from hydrogen and bromine

Preparation of hydrobromic acid directly from hydrogen and bromine

Preparation of hydrobromic acid directly from hydrogen and bromine

The apparatus for hydrobromic acid is made of a gas-washing bottle filled with water, connected to a distilling flask filled with 50 ml of bromine cooled in ice with the inlet tube leading almost to the bottom of the flask. The inlet tube is connected to a Pyrex tube, 50 cm long, packed with about 30 cm of activated charcoal which is held in place with glass wool plugs. The outlet tube connected to a U-tube filled with glass beads or porcelain chips coated with moist red phosphorus. Finally two wash bottles in series filled with 100 ml and 50 ml of water, respectively; if constant-boiling acid is desired, the second bottle should contain 100 ml of water. Both bottles are surrounded by an ice-salt bath.

A steady flow of hydrogen is started through the apparatus to displace the air. This operation requires about thirty minutes, during which time the bromine is kept in the cooling bath. The furnace is now slowly warmed to 350-375° C and the flow of hydrogen is increased to a point where the bubbles are just too rapid to count. A bath of water at 40-45°C is now placed under the vessel containing the bromine; under these conditions, conversion to hydrogen bromide is complete in about 20 minutes. No vapors of bromine should be visible at the outlet of the reaction tube; otherwise the bro­mine must be cooled somewhat in water. At the end of the experiment the two wash bottles are removed and the hydrobromic acid absorbed is determined from the gain in weight; if the smaller volume of water was used, the concentration of acid should be 60-65% by weight. If constant-boiling acid is desired, the solution should be distilled and the fraction boiling at 122-127 °C collected as 47-48% hydrobromic acid. A rapid method for determining the concentration of the solution produced is by a rough determination of specific gravity. Yield 90%.

Concentration (%) Density (g/ml)
65 1.78
60 1.68
55 1.60
50 1.52
45 1.44

2) Preparation of hydrobromic acid from phosphorus tribromide and water

Preparation of hydrobromic acid directly from phosphorus tribromide and water

Preparation of hydrobromic acid directly from phosphorus tribromide and water

In a distilling flask fitted with a dropping funnel are placed 25 g of clean sand and, over this, a mixture of 25 g of red phosphorus and 100 g of sand. The mass is moistened with 40-45 ml of water, and 50 ml of bromine are introduced into the funnel. The outlet tube connected to a U-tube filled with glass beads or porcelain chips coated with moist red phosphorus. Finally two wash bottles in series filled with 100 ml and 50 ml of water, respectively; if constant-boiling acid is desired, the second bottle should contain 100 ml of water. Both bottles are surrounded by an ice-salt bath. The reaction flask is cooled in ice while the bromine is added dropwise at a very slow rate; the phosphorus may glow with each addition of halogen. In order to avoid a suck-back of the water in the absorption flasks, it is advisable to place an empty safety trap between the U-tube and the water traps. As the reaction proceeds, the evolution of gas is more readily controlled and the cooling bath may be removed. When all the bromine has been added, the distilling flask is gently warmed to drive off the remaining acid vapors. The working-up of the hydrobromic acid solutions is the same as previously described. Yield 90%.

3) Preparation of hydrobromic acid from tetrahydronaphthalene and bromine

If anhydrous hydrogen bromide is desired, the procedure is carried out in the absence of water, using dry reagents. The same apparatus is used as for the preparation of of hydrobromic acid from phosphorus tribromide and water.

Preparation of hydrobromic acid from tetrahydronaphthalene and bromine

Preparation of hydrobromic acid from tetrahydronaphthalene and bromine

Thirty-five grams of tetrahydronaphthalene are placed in the flask with either 200 ml of water, depending on the desired concentration of the acid. At first the flask is cooled in ice while 50 ml of bromine are slowly added drop-wise ; about one gram of iron filings catalyzes the bromination. As the reaction proceeds, the flask may be allowed to warm up to room temperature. After all the bromine has been added the flask should be shaken for some time; the aqueous layer should be colorless. The acid layer is then separated from the organic material and worked up as in “Preparation of hydrobromic acid directly from hydrogen and bromine“.

4) Preparation of hydrobromic acid from potassium bromide and sulfuric acid

Preparation of hydrobromic acid from potassium bromide and sulfuric acid

Preparation of hydrobromic acid from potassium bromide and sulfuric acid

A mixture of 120 g of potassium bromide and 200 ml of water is cooled in ice while 90 ml of concentrated sulfuric acid is slowly added. The temperature must not rise over 75° C during this addition; otherwise free bromine may be formed, causing a loss in yield. The reaction mixture is cooled to room temperature and the potassium bisulfate is filtered off by suction through a fritted funnel or a hardened filter paper. The filtrate is then fractionated and the material boiling from 122-127° C is collected as constant-boiling acid. Yield 85%.

In all cases where a mixture of sulfuric and hydrobromic acids is obtained, a redistillation is necessary to remove about 0.01% of sulfate in the first fractionation; only the acid with a steady boiling point is retained. This operation entails a loss of about 15% in yield.

5) Preparation of hydrobromic acid from sulfur dioxide and bromine

Preparation of hydrobromic acid from sulfur dioxide and bromine

Preparation of hydrobromic acid from sulfur dioxide and bromine

Fifty milliliters of bromine are covered with 200 ml of water and sulfur dioxide is passed into the mixture, under the hood, until a straw-colored liquid results. Fractionation yields about 300 g of 47-48% acid, which is an almost theoretical yield. As this reaction proceeds, the bromine dissolves in the hydrobromic acid that is formed, yielding a homogeneous liquid into which the sulfur dioxide may be more rapidly introduced.

6) Preparation of hydrobromic acid from sulfur and bromine

Preparation of hydrobromic acid from sulfur and bromine

Preparation of hydrobromic acid from sulfur and bromine

One hundred and fifty grams of bromine are weighed into a glass-stoppered bottle in the hood and 10 g of powdered sulfur are quickly introduced. The bottle is then agitated and the sulfur rapidly dissolves to yield a red oily liquid. Two hundred grams of ice are placed in a 500 ml glass-stoppered bottle and the vessel is immersed in ice. About one-third of the sulfur-bromine mixture is added; over the course of about one hour the red oil disappears. Cooling is maintained throughout the hydrolysis. The second third of the sulfur-bromine compound is now added, followed by the last portion about 30 minutes later. When all the mate­rial has dissolved and reacted, a pale yellow liquid remains which is fractionally distilled as usual; b.p. 122-127°C. Yield about 300 g of hydrobromic acid.

Hydrobromic acid may be kept colorless for long periods of time by storage in a dark bottle in the refrigerator.

Inorganic laboratory preparations, by G. G. Schlessinger, 141-144, 1962

IUPAC Name

bromane

InChI

InChI=1S/BrH/h1H

InChI Key

CPELXLSAUQHCOX-UHFFFAOYSA-N

Canonical SMILES

Br

MeSH Synonyms

Acid, Hydrobromic, Bromide, Hydrogen, Hydrobromic Acid, Hydrogen Bromide

Depositor-Supplied Synonyms

Hydrogen bromide, HYDROBROMIC ACID, 10035-10-6, bromane, Bromowodor, Bromwasserstoff, Broomwaterstof, Acido bromidrico, Anhydrous hydrobromic acid, Acide bromhydrique, Bromowodor [Polish], (3h)hydrogen bromide, Broomwaterstof [Dutch], (82br)hydrogen bromide, Hydrogen bromide (HBr), Bromwasserstoff [German], UNII-3IY7CNP8XJ, Acido bromidrico [Italian], Hydrogen bromide, anhydrous, Acide bromhydrique [French], Acido bromhidrico [Spanish], Hydrobromic Acid, anyhydrous, HSDB 570, CHEBI:47266, CPELXLSAUQHCOX-UHFFFAOYSA-N, EINECS 233-113-0, Bromure d’hydrogene anhydre [French], UN1048, UN1788, Bromuro de hidrogeno anhidro [Spanish], Hydrobromic acid solution, Hydrogen bromide solution, Hydrobromic acid 62% by weight or more HBr, HBR, Hydrogen bromide in acetic acid, bromum, hydrobrornide, hydrogenbromide, hydro bromide, hyrobromic acid, hydrogen-bromide, hydrobrornic acid, Acido bromhidrico, hydro-bromic acid, bromure d’hydrogene, Hydrogen monobromide, BROMO GROUP, Hydrobromic acid 48%, Hydrobromic acid,48%, ACMC-1BUCJ, 3IY7CNP8XJ, Hydrobromic acid solution, 35Br, Bromure d’hydrogene anhydre, hydrogen bromide 33% w/w, AC1L18UA, Bromuro de hidrogeno anhidro, Hydrogen bromide, anhydrous-, KSC174Q6R, 295418_ALDRICH, 35002_RIEDEL, CHEMBL1231461, 18710_FLUKA, 18720_FLUKA, 18735_FLUKA, 23828_FLUKA, 35002_FLUKA, CHEBI:22927, CTK0H4868, MolPort-001-760-361, WKBOTKDWSSQWDR-UHFFFAOYSA-N, 18710_SIAL, 18720_SIAL, 18735_SIAL, KST-1A1208, KST-1A1544, LTBB002754, Hydrogen Bromide – Ethanol Reagent, 244260_SIAL, 248630_SIAL, 268003_SIAL, 337978_SIAL, 339245_SIAL, 438065_SIAL, Hydrogen Bromide – Methanol Reagent, AR-1A4200, AR-1A7207, AKOS015833690, EBD2198018, MCULE-6124492894, RP18384, RTR-024697, UN 1048, UN 1788, Hydrogen bromide 33% in ACETIC ACID, BP-21021, LS-77039, AB1010073, RT-000115, RT-000168, TL8000044, 11071-85-5 (hydrogen bromide (HBr2)), FT-0623202, FT-0627106, C13645, HYDROBROMIC ACID, ACS 49% UN1788(II), A800104, Hydrogen bromide, anhydrous [UN1048] [Poison gas], Hydrobromic acid, with more than 49% hydrobromic acid, Hydrogen bromide, anhydrous [UN1048] [Poison gas], Hydrobromic acid, with not more than 49% hydrobromic acid, Hydrobromic acid, with more than 49% hydrobromic acid [UN1788] [Corrosive], Hydrobromic acid, with more than 49% hydrobromic acid [UN1788] [Corrosive], Hydrobromic acid, with not more than 49% hydrobromic acid [UN1788] [Corrosive], Hydrobromic acid, with not more than 49% hydrobromic acid [UN1788] [Corrosive], 62140-56-1, BRO

Removed Synonyms

bromide, hydrobromide, BROMINE, Brome, Bromo, Brom, Bromine, isotope of mass 77, CID260, H0182, H0959, H1220, X0043, 13676-02-3, 149-26-8, 7726-95-6, BR

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